Three Day Sindhi Boli Alami Conference Festival Pictures, Sindhi Girls Photoshoot

Three Day Sindhi Boli Alami Conference Festival Pictures, Sindhi Girls Photoshoot

Three Day Sindhi Boli Alami Conference Festival Pictures, Sindhi Girls Photoshoot

Three Day Sindhi Boli Alami Conference Festival Pictures, Sindhi Girls Photoshoot

VISITORS take a keen interest in a model depicting Sindh’s culture at the Sindhi language conference and festival at the National Museum on Saturday.

Sindhi’s relevance in global economic scene discussed

‘Languages need solid strategy, not just sloganeering, to survive’

By Hasan Mansoor

KARACHI: On the second day of the three-day Sindhi language conference in the National Museum Karachi, experts spoke about the past glory of Sindhi as a business and market language, which faded a long way since independence when it lost its status as Sindh’s official language.

Intellectuals said a language which could be used in transactions and business deals, and made itself compulsory for the corporate sector had chances of survival in the future.

“Languages need solid strategy and not just sloganeering to survive and we all have this big challenge to carry on,” said Zahida Abro while speaking on political economy of languages.

The audience was informed about the relevance of Sindhi at a time when English dominated disproportionately officially, academically and in the corporate arena and Urdu was the lingua franca of Sindh’s vast urban territories.

“When we find that prescriptions of antibiotic tablets are also written in Sindhi, then we will be satisfied that our language has survived,” said writer Zulfiqar Halepoto.

Prof Aijaz Qureshi spoke on the use of Sindhi in business transaction in Sindh with the Russians and other nations of the world. However, he did not explain which alphabet(s) was used before the Arabic Naskh was introduced by the British in 1850.

The speakers said seals and transaction books had been found in Shikarpur, Sindh’s ancient capital and business hub, that showed their enterprising past, which had faded quickly in the past seven decades.

Dr Anwer Ali Shah and Prof Mazharul Haq Siddiqui also spoke.

Participants at another session on the Sindhi electronic media spoke at length about the conditions in the sector which was still in its infancy.

Professionals belonging to various TV channels admitted that there were issues of unsatisfactory wages, deficient professionalism, and capacity building of employees and improvement of their lining handicrafts and mementos meagre investment on training guistic skills.

Visitors thronged the stalls sell amid dance and music performances.

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